Faculty News 2004

  • On Point: Prisoner Abuse Leaks
    December 22, 2004
    Scott Silliman, Director of the Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law takes part in hour-long discussion of allegations of prisoner abuse by U.S. forces in Iraq and at Guanatanamo Bay. WBUR Boston's "On Point." (audio)
  • Supreme Court to hear Simi Valley search case
    December 8, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to the Los Angeles Times on the case of Muehler v. Mena, which came before the Supreme Court on December 8. Chemerinsky was co-counsel for the respondent, Mena.
  • Bob Barker's $1M gift to boost study of animal rights law at Duke
    December 7, 2004
    Commenting on TV host Bob Barker's $1 million gift to Duke Law School to create the Bob Barker Endowment Fund for the Study of Animal Rights Law, Charles L. B. Lowndes Emeritus Professor of Law William Reppy, Jr., tells Durham's Herald-Sun about the Law School's current animal rights program. Associate Dean for Alumni and Development Tom Hadzor also comments.
  • Senate's 'Nuclear Option'
    December 5, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky co-authors this opinion-editorial in the Los Angeles Times, arguing that the GOP plan to eliminate the filibuster for judicial nominations would do lasting damage to the Senate.
  • Case goes on in secret
    December 2, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, comments to the Denver Post on an Army investigating officer's decision to close a preliminary judicial hearing that will help decide whether four soldiers will face trial on murder and dereliction-of-duty charges relating to the death of an Iraqi general.
  • Retaliation at issue in discrimination case
    December 1, 2004
    The New York Times reports on Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law Walter Dellinger's argument before the Supreme Court in Jackson v. Birmingham Board of Education that Title IX protects those who complain about sex discrimination from retaliation.
  • Supreme Court Case Tests Title IX Protections
    November 30, 2004
    Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law Walter Dellinger talks to NPR's "Morning Edition" about the nature of Title IX complaints and Jackson v. Birmingham Board of Education which he will argue before the Supreme Court November 30.
  • Enlisting Law Schools in Campaign for Animals
    November 27, 2004
    Charles L. B. Lowndes Emeritus
    Professor of Law William A. Reppy, Jr., tells The New York Times how Duke Law School plans to use a $1 million dollar gift from television host Bob Barker in areas relating to animal rights law.
  • Nomination Could Bridge Divide
    November 22, 2004
    In this opinion-editorial in the Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel, Assistant Professor of Law Neil Siegel writes that by appointing a moderate conservative to fill any Supreme Court vacancy, President Bush could begin to heal divisions in the country and build a legacy.
  • Thou Shalt Not?
    November 21, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky discusses with The News and Observer his pending Supreme Court challenge to the display of a monument of the Ten Commandments on the grounds of the Texas state legislature.
  • The untouchable pot of gold
    November 19, 2004
    CNN/Money discusses pending approval for Duke Law Professor Francis McGovern's plan to divide among investors $435 million in finds generated from coporate scandals.
  • Marines defend actions of an accused comrade
    November 17, 2004
    Duke Law Professor Madeline Morris comments to the International Herald Tribune on the case of a U.S. marine who was depicted in video footage fatally shooting a suspected Iraqi insurgent.
  • November 13, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells the Los Angeles Times that the First Amendment does not protect speech that creates a hostile and discriminatory climate at work.
  • Ashcroft blasts judges
    November 13, 2004
    LENS Director and Professor of the Practice of Law Scott Silliman comments to Newsday on departing Attorney-General John Ashcroft's assertion that federal judges used "intrusive judicial oversight" in reining in President Bush's anti-terrorism plans.
  • US plans to expand Guantanamo prison
    November 13, 2004
    Scott Silliman, LENS director and professor of the practice of law discusses the legality of detaining "enemy combatants" at Guantanamo Bay on WBUR's "Here and Now."
  • Courts put up warning signs on Bush's road from Guantanamo
    November 10, 2004
    LENS director and Professor of the Practice of Law Scott Silliman tells the Financial Times that the government has to be concerned that it has now suffered three adverse rulings, all of which imapct on the detention and prosecution of detainees at Guantanamo Bay.
  • Are prisoners held in Guantamo Bay enemy combatants?
    November 9, 2004
    LENS Director and Professor of the Practice of Law Scott Silliman talks to CNN's "Newsnight" about a ruling that calls into question the trial of Guantanamo Bay detainees by military commissions. (transcript)
  • Bush adminstration suffers another setback in Guantanamo Bay trials
    November 9, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law comments to USA Today on a federal judge's decision to halt the trial by military commission of detainee Salim Ahmed Hamdan. (Story contains link to related article.)
  • U.S. Judge Halts War-Crime Trial at Guantanamo
    November 9, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security comments to The New York Times on the government's assertion that Guantanamo prisoners are outside the Geneva Conventions, as well as the future of combatant status review panels currently going on.
  • Foreign Policy
    November 7, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, tells Raleigh's News and Observer how he thinks the Bush administration should mend some of the country's "fractious international relations."
  • Perhaps It's Time to Leave the Union
    November 6, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells the Los Angeles Daily News that while it's theoretically possible for some western states to secede from the United States, "realistically it won't happen."
  • Guardsman fights redeployment to Iraq
    November 4, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and Professor of the Practice of Law comments to NPR's "All Things Considered" on the effect a successful legal challenge to the Army's "stop-loss" policy could have on active duty forces.
  • Senate victories give Bush power to mould Supreme Court in his own image
    November 4, 2004
    Assistant Professor of Law Neil Siegel comments to London Times on the implications of the Republican victory for the appointment of conservatives to the Supreme Court.
  • Experts say Bush win shows tilt to the right
    November 3, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky and Assistant Professor of Law Neil Siegel comment to Durham Herald-Sun on the implications of Republican victory.
  • Popularity Contest: In defense of the Electoral College
    November 2, 2004
    Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law Walter Dellinger defends the Electoral College and the mandate of the presidential candidate who wins the majority of Electoral College votes in this posting on Slate.com.
  • The election and the U.S. Supreme Court
    November 2, 2004
    Assistant Professor of Law Neil Siegel authored this opinion-editorial in the Chicago Tribune on the importance of the 2004 presidential election to the future of the Supreme Court.
  • New tribunal for detainees faces challenge
    November 1, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law tells USA Today that only if the revamped military tribunal getting underway at Guantanamo Bay has a greater appearance of fairness than it had originally will the U.S. government be able to convince other nations that it can bring terrorism suspects to justice outside U.S. courts.
  • To Bush, courts count for little
    October 31, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells St. Petersburg Times that in legal filings pertaining to detainees held at Guantanamo Bay, the government is essentially ignoring the Supreme Court ruling in Rasul v. Bush. Chemerinsky is currently representing a detainee.
  • Battle Over 3-Strikes Measure Heats Up
    October 29, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky comments to Los Angeles Times on a California ballot initiative that would scale back that state's "three-strikes" law.
  • Chief Justice Rehnquist Treated for Thyroid Cancer
    October 26, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells Bloomberg News that the composition of the Supreme Court is as important as any issue in the presidential campaign.
  • Memo Lets CIA Take Detainees Out of Iraq
    October 24, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, tells The Washington Post that a Justice Department memorandum authorizing the CIA to transfer detainees out of Iraq for interrogation "seeks to create a legal regime justifying conduct that the international community clearly considers in violation of international law and the [Geneva] Convention."
  • N.C. Constitution: Why change it?
    October 24, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky and Assistant Professor of Law Neil Siegel comment to the News and Observer on the tendency for state constitutions to be amended frequently.
  • A New Judgment Day for Decalogue Displays
    October 23, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky talks to The Washington Post about his upcoming Supreme Court challenge to the display of a six-foot granite monument of the Ten Commandments on the grounds of the Texas statehouse.
  • Disney Directors on Trial for a Payout
    October 21, 2004
    As an expert witness for the prosecution, David F. Cavers Professor of Law Deborah A. DeMott testifies that Disney directors and officers breached their fiduciary duties to shareholders in connection with the selection, employment, and later termination of and severance paid to former Disney president Michael S. Ovitz. The New York Times reports.
  • Nothwest Airlines' Underfunded Pension Fund Draws SEC Inquiry
    October 21, 2004
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox comments to "CNN Money" and the Saint Paul Pioneer Press on the SEC's probes of coporate pension funds.
  • Witness assails Disney's Ovitz deal
    October 21, 2004
    As reported by the Los Angeles Times, David F. Cavers Professor of Law Deborah A. DeMott testifies that Disney's board of directors should have met to discuss Michael Ovitz's costly hiring and firing. (Also covered in Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, USA Today.)
  • Eliot Spitzer's charge against insurance
    October 19, 2004
    On NPR's "Marketplace," Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James D. Cox explains allegations of wrongdoing within the insurance industry through contingent commissions and bid-rigging.
  • Supreme Court: Aging judiciary heralds historic transformation
    October 18, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells the San Francisco Chronicle that the upcoming election is likely to have a pivotal role in determining the composition of the court and of constitutional law for many years to come.
  • Town Hall Tonight!
    October 8, 2004
    On the op-ed page of The New York Times, Assistant Professor of Law Jedediah Purdy formulates a question he would like to ask President Bush regarding tax cuts, resulting deficits, and the future of social programs; he asks for reassurance about the future of America.
  • Unless feds spend less, our economy will suffer
    October 5, 2004
    Professor of Law Richard Schmalbeck authored this opinion editorial in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, accusing the Bush administration of abandoning one of the primary Republican principles: fiscal responsibility.
  • Who should own science?
    October 1, 2004
    William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law James Boyle, a co-founder of Science Commons, explains to The Chronicle of Higher Education how this voluntary licensing scheme can make scientific research more accessible among university researchers and the public than traditional patent and trade-secret regimes.
  • The next president could tip high court
    September 29, 2004
    USA Today names Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law Walter Dellinger as a possible nominee to the Supreme Court if John Kerry is elected president.
  • Judicial picks hang on election results
    September 26, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells the Contra Costa Times that a president's most long-lasting legacy is the federal judges.
  • Martha Stewart Asks to Begin Sentence as Soon as Possible
    September 16, 2004
    The New York Times quotes portions of letter from Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law, Walter Dellinger, lead appeals counsel for Martha Stewart, to United States District Judge Miriam Goldman Cedarbaum.
  • Give us liberties as an issue
    September 14, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky calls for the Democrats to stress the issue of civil liberties during the election campaign in this opinion-editorial in the Raleigh News and Observer. (Unavailable online.)
  • Dementia and the Voter
    September 13, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky tells The Washington Post that it is striking how little law there is on the definition of voter competence.
  • Bush's military service in question--again
    September 8, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of the Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, comments to U.S. News and World Report on Air National Guard rules regarding attendance at drills.
  • Fla.Supremes to Hear Schiavo Right-to-Die Case
    August 31, 2004
    Alston & Bird Professor of Law Erwin Chemerinsky, commenting on Florida's "Terri's Law," tells law.com that "if a judicial ruling can be overturned by the Legislature, then the courts are rendering nothing more than advisory opinions."
  • Tribunal struggles with first hearings
    August 29, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center on Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, comments to USA Today on the beginning of the first military tribunal in over 50 years.
  • At Law Schools, Students Flock to Governance Courses
    August 27, 2004
    Brainerd Currie Professor of Law James Cox and Professor of Law Robinson O. Everett comment to The Wall Street Journal on the popularity of governance courses.
  • Army investigators link dozens to abuse at Abu Ghraib prison
    August 26, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, praises the Fay-Jones report on the abuses at Abu Ghraib prison to The Seattle Times.
  • Pentagon blamed over jail 'sadism'
    August 26, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, comments on Schlesinger report on Abu Ghraib abuses to The Guardian (London). (Also in Taipai Times)
  • Athletic prowess, fallible judging
    August 25, 2004
    Professor of law Paul Haagen tells The Christian Science Monitor that embarrassing errors by Olympic judges should bring about changes in the rules. (Fee required for article.)
  • Abu Ghraib Probes Shift Public Focus
    August 24, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, comments to USA Today that "For President Bush, "the timing (of two examinations of the prisoner abuses late last year at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib prison)couldn't be worse, right before the Republican convention."
  • Guantanamo hearings start today
    August 23, 2004
    Law Professor Scott Silliman tells USA Today that the debut of the first military tribunal in over 50 years has "huge significance" in U.S. legal history.
  • Lindh's lawyer wants lighter sentence
    August 14, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, comments to San Francisco Chronicle on the request by attorneys for John Walker Lindh for a reduced sentence, in light of the Hamdi case.
  • U.S.: "No legal rights for detainees"
    August 13, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of the Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, tells USA Today that the Bush administration's hard-line stance on the rights of the Guantanamo Bay prisoners stems from the concern about how far federal judges will delve into the capture of detainees.
  • The Apple of forbidden knowledge
    August 12, 2004
    William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law James Boyle makes his debut as one of four bi-weekly columnists featured in the Financial Times online-edition's "New Economy Forum." In this column, he details lessons for the "new economy" to be gleaned from Apple's opposition to a RealNetworks program that makes the iPod "interoperable" with a RealNetworks music format.
  • U.S. Nears Deal to Free Enemy Combatant Hamdi
    August 12, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of the Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, comments to the Washington Post on Justice Department comments regarding possible release of Yaser Esam Hamdi.
  • Group Weighs Opposing Detainee Treatment
    August 5, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, comments to the New York Times about the American Bar Association's consideration of a statement against the Bush administration's treatment of overseas detainees and recommendations that would make it easier to prosecute members of the U.S. military and civilians who torture prisoners.
  • Courtroom master faces biggest jury
    July 28, 2004
    Russell M. Robinson II Professor of Law Neil Vidmar comments to USA Today on John Edwards' skill before juries, and how it might translate to large groups in the course of the presidential campaign.
  • Appellate lawyer a star on his own
    July 17, 2004
    The News and Observer profiles Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law Walter Dellinger, who will be representing Martha Stewart in appealing her conviction stemming from her sale of stock in ImClone Systems Inc. Professor James Coleman comments.
  • Prosecutors' powerful tool can be shared with others
    July 7, 2004
    Law Professor Sara Sun Beale comments to Providence Journal on prosecutors' power under the Patriot Act to share federal grand jury information with federal agencies such as the CIA, the Defense Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency.
  • One Eye on Principle, the Other on the People's Will
    July 4, 2004
    Walter E. Dellinger, Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law, comments to the New York Times on U.S. Supreme Court decisions regarding detention of alleged enemy combatants.
  • Legal Scholars Criticize Memos on Torture
    June 25, 2004
    Walter Dellinger, Douglas B. Maggs Professor of Law, comments to the New York Times on recently released Justice Department memorandums concerning torture.
  • 4 Fort Carson soldiers face charges in death of Iraq general
    June 24, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and Professor of the Practice of Law, comments to the Denver Post on U.S. Army plans to file negligent homicide and manslaughter charges against two military intelligence officers who allegedly suffocated an Iraqi general during interrogation.
  • Sprinter accused of using steroids
    June 23, 2004
    Jim Coleman, Senior Associate Dean and Professor of the Practice of Law, tells the News and Observer that, in his experience, the number of drugs sprinter Tim Montgomery is accused by the USADA of using does not seem plausible.
  • New Trend Before Grand Juries: Meet the Accused
    June 20, 2004
    Law Professor Sara Sun Beale comments to the New York Times on the recent trend of defense lawyers allowing suspects to testify before grand juries, a practice that seems to be resulting in fewer indictments.
  • Tiptoeing around 'Under God'
    June 15, 2004
    Erwin Chemerinsky, who will be joining Duke Law School July 1 as the Alston and Bird Professor of Law, authored this opinion editorial in the Los Angeles Times, criticizing the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in the Newdow case to duck the issue of whether the words "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance violate the Consitution.
  • Secrets may not ever go to jury
    June 13, 2004
    Robert Mosteller, Harry R. Chadwick Sr. Professor of Law, commenting to the News and Observer on hearsay exceptions in the context of the unsolved arsenic poisoning of Eric Miller, says that a statement may not be trustworthy just because somone told it to their attorney.
  • Hunter is cooperating in Balco investigation
    June 12, 2004
    Law Professor Sara Sun Beale comments to New York Times on the request by one of Marion Jones' lawyers to release her grand jury testimony in the Balco anti-doping investigation.
  • Spate of military cases results in scrutiny
    June 11, 2004
    Scott Silliman, Director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security, comments to the News and Observer about the fairness of courts-martial proceedings and the differences between courts-martials and military tribunals.
  • An open-source shot in the arm?
    June 10, 2004
    This feature story in the The Economist cites the proposal of Duke Law professor Arti Rai and her collaborators, for the Tropical Disease Initiative, an open-source approach to invent drugs to fight tropical diseases.
  • Majority Vote, Contract May be Hurdles to Firing.
    June 4, 2004
    Allen Siegel, Duke Law Professor and specialist in labor and employment contracts, comments to Charlotte Observer on proposed grounds for terminating Union County Manager.
  • Tribunal Lawyers Say Defense Short on Resources
    June 3, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, comments to USA Today about a "bureaucratic nightmare" in the run-up to the first trials by U.S. military tribunals since World War II.
  • New Info on Padilla Not Part of Court Case
    June 2, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, comments to the Guardian about the U.S. administration's recent release of information about suspected terrorist Jose Padilla.
  • Anti-Doping Agency Enters Gray Area
    May 27, 2004
    Jim Coleman, senior associate dean and professor of the practice of law, comments to the New York Times about the prosecution of athletes accused of using performance enhancing drugs.
  • CNN News night with Aaron Brown
    May 27, 2004
    Jim Coleman, senior associate dean and a co-creator of the U.S. Federation Track and Field Anti-Doping Program, speaks about the current controversy surrounding Olympic champion sprinter Marion Jones.
  • The Legal Line - International Law
    May 16, 2004
    Scott Silliman, director of Duke's Center for Law, Ethics and National Security and professor of the practice of law, comments to the News and Observer about prison abuse at Abu Ghraib.
  • Senate committee looks at Balco file
    April 29, 2004
    Jim Coleman, senior associate dean and professor of the practice of law, comments to the International Herald Tribune about prosecution of athletes accused of using performance enhancing drugs.
  • Senate Committee Receives Documents in Steroids Case
    April 28, 2004
    Jim Coleman, senior associate dean and professor of the practice of law, comments to the New York Times about prosecution of athletes accused of using performance enhancing drugs.
  • EASLEY HAS OWN PARDON PROCESS STEPS NOT SPELLED OUT BY LAW, COUNSEL SAYS
    April 11, 2004
    Jim Coleman, director of Duke Law School's Innocence Project, senior associate dean and professor of the practice of law, comments to the Winston-Salem Journal about N.C. Gov. Mike Easley's handling of Darryl Hunt's pardon request after DNA testing cleared him of the rape and murder in 1984 of newspaper copy editor Deborah Sykes. He spent 18 years in prison.
  • Justice, thwarted by secrecy
    April 6, 2004
    Ralf Michaels, associate professor of law, authored this opinion editorial in the News and Observer about judicial proceedings and national security in terms of the war on terrorism.
  • Shelter From the Storm?
    March 25, 2004
    James Cox, Brainerd Currie Professor of Law, comments to Newsweek about Martha Stewart's chances of staying out of jail.
  • USC's Chemerinsky Leaving L.A. for Duke School of Law
    March 4, 2004
    The Los Angeles Times reports on Duke Law's hiring of professors Erwin Chemerinsky and Catherine Fisk. Chemerinsky is a constitutional law expert and Fisk is a noted labor law professor.
  • As Spender, Ovitz Was $6-Million Man
    March 1, 2004
    This article in the Los Angeles Times about Disney, former CEO Michael Ovitz and Chairman Michael Eisner quotes a report by Deborah DeMott, David F. Cavers Professor of Law. The report examines the corporate governance involved in the hiring and firing of Michael Ovitz.
  • For Disney's Eisner, Years Of Corporate Sparring Catch Up
    March 1, 2004
    This article in the Wall Street Journal about Disney, quotes a report by Deborah DeMott, David F. Cavers Professor of Law. The report examines the corporate governance involved in the hiring and firing of Michael Ovitz.
  • Ace mediator is man for all impasses
    February 29, 2004
    The News and Observer featured Francis McGovern, professor of law, as its Tar Heel of the Week in this Feb. 29 article. McGovern was recently chosen to oversee the payout of $400 million to investors who claim they lost money in the stock market because of biased Wall Street research.
    James Cox, Brainerd Currie Professor of Law, comments on his colleague's task in the article.
  • COMPANIES THE AMERICAS: Eisner criticised in Ovitz report
    February 27, 2004
    A report by Deborah DeMott, David F. Cavers Professor of Law, is quoted in this article about Disney in the Financial Times. The report examines the corporate governance involved in the hiring and firing of Michael Ovitz.
  • Cooper rebuked in Gell case
    February 22, 2004
    Jim Coleman, director of Duke Law School's Innocence Project, senior associate dean for academic affairs and professor of the practice of law, comments to The News & Observer about N.C. Attorney General Roy Cooper's handling of former death row inmate Alan Gell's case.
  • Disney's Takeover Guru
    February 19, 2004
    James Cox, Brainerd Currie Professor of Law, comments to Bloomberg News about possible steps Michael Eisner may take to thwart further takeover bids for Disney.
    The story also appeared in Newsday and the St. Petersburg Times.
  • How far sports steroid scandal might spread
    February 19, 2004
    Doriane Coleman, professor of law, comments to The Christian Science Monitor about the recent steroid scandal involving BALCO and professional athletes.
  • STREET SWEEP : Specialist Settlement Analysis, CNNfn
    February 18, 2004
    James Cox, Brainerd Currie Professor of Law, commented on the recent SEC-New York Stock Exchange settlement while a guest on CNNfn's "Street Sweep."
  • U.S. provides visitors not-so-warm welcome
    February 16, 2004
    Ralf Michaels, associate professor of law, authored this opinion editorial in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution about the U.S. government subjecting foreigners to fingerprinting upon entering the country.
  • Turning off foreigners at the airport
    February 15, 2004
    Ralf Michaels, associate professor of law, authored this opinion editorial in the News and Observer about the requirement that foreigners be fingerprinted upon entering the country.
  • J.Lo's split decision: What about the ring?
    January 30, 2004
    Katharine Bartlett, Dean and A. Kenneth Pye Professor of Law, and Laura Underkuffler, professor of law, comment to the News and Observer about who has the right to the ring after a failed engagement, the bride or groom?
  • Index Funds Drawing Scrutiny of Regulators; Investigators are examining the disparity in the fees charged by different companies
    James Cox, Brainerd Currie Professor of Law, tells the Los Angeles Times that the Securities and Exchange Commission is correct to pursue an investigation into the disparity in the fees charged by different fund companies.
  • The Tyranny of Copyright?
    January 25, 2004
    James Boyle, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law, comments to the New York Times about public domain and copyright issues.
  • Detainee cases hit court
    January 23, 2004
    Scott Silliman, professor of the practice of law and executive director of the Duke Center on Law, Ethics and National Security, comments to The Christian Science Monitor about the Supreme Court's decision to look into whether President Bush is acting within his constitutional authority in ordering the indefinite detention of those he has designated "enemy combatants."
  • Is The Nation Ready To Take The First Step?
    January 22, 2004
    Story in the Charlotte Observer covering a panel discussion at Duke Law School with Historian John Hope Franklin, former U.S. ambassador to South Africa James Joseph and public policy professor William A. "Sandy" Darity Jr. discussing reparations.
  • Marker Is Dropped Off At City Hall Robinson Says He Didn't Know Procedure To Get A Permit To Put It There
    January 20, 2004
    William Van Alstyne, William R. Perkins and Thomas C. Perkins Professor of Law, comments to the Winston-Salem Journal about the 1-ton granite marker inscribed with the Ten Commandments and the Bill of Rights Winston-Salem City Council Member Vernon Robinson illegally put up a in front of City Hall.
  • U.S. serves up puzzling case against Martha Stewart
    January 19, 2004
    James Cox, Brainerd Currie Professor of Law, comments to the Philadelphia Inquirer about the Martha Stewart case.